Technique

 

Cross Blading adapts technique from alpine skiing and cross country (skate) skiing and speed skating. Solid technique takes time, but this should help you learn faster and avoid some common mistakes. Cross Blading is relatively low impact, unless of course you fall.

There are some things that work well for most skaters, but technique is flexible and evolving and there are no rules or points for style. Alpine and XC skiers, inline and ice skaters will all approach Cross Blading differently. The key is to find safe terrain for your initial miles and soon you will get it. As you gain confidence you’ll seek more challenging terrain.

Before you head out please allow me to help you easily avoid many common mistakes and read the safety page.

Here are some videos to give you some of the fundamentals

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This European junior racing video is a good example of Nordic inline skating. Even though they have a closed course with padded turns, bombing down hills like this is sketchy, so Cross Blading uses Alpine ski turns for speed control (and fun).
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Classic inline speed skating

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Olympian gettin’ ‘er done on snow. Note the gear shift from V2 (one pole per leg stroke) to V1 (one pole ever other leg stroke).

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Alpine slalom skiing on inline skates

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Cross overs are especially useful for Cross Bladers. The technique is for intermediate to advanced skaters and takes practice, but it’s worth it. Skaters can generate a lot of speed through turns. Note: Cross overs do not work well for road skis or Skike (due to their length).

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Here skating icon Eddy Matzger teaches the basics of cross overs.

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The skate double push is advanced technique and not necessary for Cross Blading, but it can add speed, fun and variety to your workout.
After a Nordic skater exceeds the speed where poles are effective, the next gear shift is to speed skating technique. This is where the double push can add speed.


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Here Eddy Matzger covers the all important art of stopping.

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Dealing with hills is either fun or scary. Here Eddy Matzger covers the basics.

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Enjoy and please leave us you technique thoughts or questions below.

 Posted by at 8:13 pm

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